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Saint Johns, FL 32259

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Home » Your Eye Health » Eye Conditions » Eye Floaters and Spots

Eye Floaters and Spots

Eye floaters are spots, squiggles or flecks that appear to drift into your visual field. Usually they are harmless, a benign, albeit annoying sign of aging. If however, your floaters are accompanied by a sudden loss of vision, pain or flashes, they could be a sign of an underlying serious eye condition and should be checked out by an eye doctor as soon as possible.

What are Eye Floaters and Spots?

Floaters, like their name, are specks or spots that float in and out of your visual field. Usually they move away when you try to focus on them. They can appear as dark dots, threads, squiggles, webs, or even rings.

But what causes them to appear? Floaters are shadows from clumps of fibers within the vitreous, the jelly-like substance in your eye, that are cast on the retina at the back of the eye. Usually, floaters don’t go away, but you tend to get used to them and eventually notice them less. Patients usually see them more when they are looking at a plain background, like the blue sky or a white wall.

In most cases, there is no treatment for floaters, people just get used to them, however if there are more serious symptoms that accompany them, there could be an underlying problem such as inflammation, diabetes or a retinal tear that needs to be addressed and treated. If the floaters are so serious that they are blocking your vision, a surgical procedure to remove the clumps may be performed.

What Causes Floaters?

Age: Although floaters may be present at any age, they are often more apparent as a result of aging. With time, the fibers in the vitreous begin to shrink and clump up as they pull away from the back of the eye. These clumps block some of the light passing through your eye, causing the shadows which appear as floaters. You are also more likely to develop floaters if you are nearsighted.

Eye Surgery or Injury: Individuals who have previously had an injury, trauma or eye surgery are more susceptible to floaters. This includes cataract surgery and laser surgery as well as other types of eye surgery.

Eye Disease: Certain eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, eye tumors or severe inflammation can lead to floaters.

Retinal Tears or Detachment: Retinal tears or detachments can be a cause of floaters. A torn retina can lead to a retinal detachment which is a very serious condition where the retina separates from the back of the eye and if untreated can lead to permanent vision loss.

When to See a Doctor

There are some cases where seeing spots is accompanied by other symptoms that could be a sign that there is a more serious underlying problem. The most common of these is seeing flashes of light. This often happens when the vitreous is pulling on the retina which would be a warning sign of a retinal detachment. Retinal detachment must be treated immediately or you can risk a permanent loss of vision. Flashes of light sometimes also appear as symptoms of migraine headaches.

If you experience a sudden onset or increase in floaters, flashes of light, pain, loss of side vision or other vision disturbances, see a doctor immediately. Further, if you have recently had eye surgery or a trauma and you are experiencing floaters during your recovery, it is advised to tell your doctor.

Generally, floaters are merely a harmless annoyance but keep an eye on your symptoms. As with any sudden or serious change in your health, it is worth having them checked out if they are really bothering you. In some cases, they may be an early warning sign of a serious problem that requires swift treatment to preserve your vision.

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Update on COVID-19 (03/30/2020)

We wanted to thank you for your continued support of our office during this challenging time. We will continue to be open from 9:00am-1:00pm Monday through Friday to dispense contact lens and eyeglasses orders. We will also be able to order additional contact lenses for patients who may be running low.

While all routine eye care is still deferred during this time, we will remain available to triage eye emergencies. We will send out additional notifications as soon as it becomes possible to resume routine eyecare.

Please call or text us at (904)287-4567 or email us at cfec2@2drfishers.com with any questions for concerns.

*****CONTACT WEARERS*****

With the day to day changes surrounding COVID-19, we do not know how much longer we will be open to the public. With that being said, if you are a contact lens wearer, and currently have less than a 3 month supply of lenses, we highly recommend that you place an order now. We will offer free shipping on lenses directly to your home (with a minimum of 2 boxes). We will also extend contact lenses prescriptions, as needed, for those expiring within the next three months.

Please call or text us at (904)287-4567 or email us at cfec2@2drfishers.com.

Hours: As of March 30, we will be open from 9:00am – 1:00pm Monday through Friday only to dispense contact lens and eyeglass orders. We will have a doctor available to see ocular emergencies if needed.

Routine Eye Exams: If you are scheduled for a routine eye examination appointment during our closure, we will reschedule your appointment. As of March 30, 2020, we will begin rescheduling routine eye examination appointments for April 13th and later.

I need to replace my glasses. What do I do? Please contact us at (904)287-4567. We may be able to extend your prescription during this time and will help you with your eyewear needs.

I’m nearly out of contact lenses. What do I do? Please contact us at (904)287-4567. We may be able to extend your prescription during this time, and/or place an order for your contact lenses and have them shipped to your house (with a minimum of 2 boxes).

I need a refill on the medication prescribed to me by the practice. What do I do? Please contact us at (904)287-4567 or cfec2@2drfishers.com. We can transmit a refill for your prescription directly to your pharmacy so that you have the medication that you need.

I need to pick up my order. What do I do? We will be open from 9:00am – 1:00pm Monday through Friday only to dispense contact lens and eyeglass orders.

I don’t feel comfortable coming into the office to pick up my order. What do I do? Please contact us at (904)287-4567 and we can bring your contact lens or glasses order out to your car. Since we are working with reduced staff, please allow us extra time for curbside pick-up. Also, when you place your contact lens order, you can elect to have them shipped to your home.

What about an eye emergency after your shortened business hours? What can I do? If you have an ocular emergency, please call (904)287-4567 and wait for instructions at the end of the message.

Our doctors will do their best to accommodate your needs whenever possible during this time. We have reduced our staff hours until further notice to protect them, our patients, our community, and our nation. Despite the financial and emotional hardships this will cause, we ask every one of you to do the same.

Together, we will weather this storm.